Apprentices get help with training and getting certified thanks to new Government of Canada Union Training and Innovation Program

[:en]GATINEAU, QC, May 15, 2017 /CNW/ – Giving every Canadian a real and fair chance at success means helping them get the skills and training they need to get good jobs, earn a good living, and look after their families. Today, the Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour, announced that the Government of Canada is rolling out a plan to support the next generation of apprentices and tradespeople  – particularly women and Indigenous people – get the skills they need to succeed in a changing economy.

Minister Hajdu made the announcement of $85 million to support training in the skilled trades while speaking at a conference hosted by Canada’s Building Trades Union in Gatineau, Quebec.

The Government of Canada will launch the program through a call for proposals beginning on July 24th. Apprentices and tradespeople will benefit from this new program that supports union-based apprenticeship training, innovation and enhanced partnerships. These investments will create a more skilled, mobile and certified trades workforce who have access to good quality jobs, which will in turn strengthen Canada’s middle class.

The Government of Canada worked with unions, stakeholders, as well as provinces and territories to design the program. It will include two streams of funding. Under the first stream, unions will receive financial support to purchase up-to-date training equipment and materials to help unions keep up with constant technological change and meet industry standards. The second stream will fund innovative approaches to break down barriers that deter women and Indigenous people from starting a career in the skilled trades.

As this government rolls out its historic investments in infrastructure across the country, demand for skilled tradespeople will only increase.

The Government’s Union Training and Innovation Program will also improve apprenticeship completion rates in Canada. Today, only about 50% of apprentices complete their training and become certified journeypersons.   Women and Indigenous people face particular challenges in completing their training and finding work.

Quotes

“We’re helping apprentices and tradespeople get the skills they need to succeed, and breaking down barriers for women and Indigenous people in pursuing a great career in a skilled trade. This new program is just one part of our plan to help Canadians in the middle class, and those working so hard to join it, get good, well-paying jobs.

– The Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour

“We are pleased with the launch of this program. It will support union-based apprenticeship training in Canada and serve to support the development of a future-focused construction workforce, helping meet the needs of our members.”

Robert Blakely, Chief Operating Officer, Canada’s Building Trades Union

Quick Facts

  • Announced in Budget 2016, the Union Training and Innovation Program will be launched in 2017-18 with initial funding of $10 million and $25 million annually.
  • A call for proposals for the program will begin on July 24th.
  • There will be two streams of funding:
    • financial support for unions to purchase up-to-date training equipment and materials to help unions keep up with constant technological change and meet industry standards
    • funding for innovative approaches to break down barriers facing women and Indigenous people who want to enter the skilled trades

Backgrounder

The Union Training and Innovation Program, which was announced in Budget 2016, will target the Red Seal trades and involve broad-based partnerships with a number of stakeholders. It is expected that the Program will:

  • help to improve the quality of training through investment in equipment;
  • incorporate greater union involvement in apprenticeship training; and,
  • support innovative approaches and partnerships with other stakeholders, including employers.

The Program is open to all unions, including those that do not provide training recognized by provinces and territories as in‑class technical apprenticeship training, and those that do not operate training facilities.

The skilled trades are a growing and a vital part of our economy, and promoting careers in these areas is critical to our future. Despite an increase in apprenticeship enrolment, the trades are still perceived as being a second choice over a university education. A 2012 survey indicated that even though two thirds of 15 year old students believe the skilled trades pay well, less than 10% reported that they definitely planned to pursue a career in the skilled trades. Those who expressed interest were also more likely to have lower scores in math, reading and problem-solving, which are barriers to successfully completing an apprenticeship program.

The Program aims to help groups that face additional barriers to participation and success in the trades, such as women and Indigenous people. Women’s representation in non-traditional Red Seal trades was at 4% in 2014. Challenges that women face to enter the trades include attitudinal barriers, lack of mentors, difficulty finding an employer, discrimination and family obligations.  Indigenous people also face similar barriers, in addition to others such as insufficient financial supports, cultural differences and negative stereotypes.

SOURCE Employment and Social Development Canada [:fr]GATINEAU, QC, le 15 mai 2017 /CNW/ – Pour donner aux Canadiens des chances réelles et égales de réussite, il faut les aider à acquérir les compétences et à terminer la formation dont ils ont besoin pour obtenir un bon emploi, bien gagner leur vie et prendre soin de leur famille. Aujourd’hui, la ministre de l’Emploi, du Développement de la main-d’œuvre et du Travail, l’honorable Patty Hajdu, a annoncé que le gouvernement du Canada mettait en œuvre un plan visant à appuyer la prochaine génération d’apprentis et de gens de métiers – tout particulièrement les femmes et les Autochtones – dans l’acquisition des compétences dont ils ont besoin pour réussir dans une économie en évolution.

La ministre Hajdu a annoncé un financement de 85 millions de dollars en aide à la formation dans les métiers spécialisés. La ministre a fait cette annonce lors d’une conférence organisée par les Syndicats des métiers de la construction du Canada, à Gatineau (Québec).

Le gouvernement du Canada lancera le programme au moyen d’un appel de propositions qui commencera le 24 juillet. Les apprentis et les gens de métiers bénéficieront de ce nouveau programme qui soutient la formation d’apprenti, l’innovation et le renforcement des partenariats en milieu syndical. Ces investissements permettront de créer une main‑d’œuvre plus qualifiée, mobile et certifiée dans les métiers spécialisés qui a accès à des emplois de qualité, ce qui aura pour effet de renforcer la classe moyenne du Canada.

Le gouvernement du Canada a conçu le programme de concert avec les syndicats, les intervenants ainsi que les provinces et territoires. Le programme comprendra deux volets. Dans le cadre du premier volet, les syndicats recevront une aide financière pour acheter de l’équipement et du matériel de formation modernes qui aideront les syndicats à suivre l’évolution constante de la technologie et à satisfaire aux normes de l’industrie. Le second volet visera à financer des façons novatrices de surmonter les difficultés qui empêchent les femmes et les Autochtones d’entreprendre une carrière dans les métiers spécialisés.

Au fur et à mesure que le gouvernement réalise ses investissements historiques dans l’infrastructure aux quatre coins du pays, la demande en gens de métiers spécialisés augmentera.

De plus, le Programme pour la formation et l’innovation en milieu syndical améliorera le taux d’achèvement de la formation d’apprenti au Canada. À l’heure actuelle, seulement quelque 50 % des apprentis terminent leur formation et obtiennent leur certificat de compagnon. Les femmes et les Autochtones en particulier se heurtent à des difficultés pour ce qui est de terminer leur formation et de trouver du travail.

Citations

« Nous aidons les apprentis et les gens de métiers à acquérir les compétences dont ils ont besoin pour réussir, et nous écartons des obstacles pour les femmes et les Autochtones qui veulent faire carrière dans un métier spécialisé. Ce nouveau programme n’est qu’une partie de notre plan visant à aider les Canadiens de la classe moyenne et ceux qui travaillent fort pour en faire partie à obtenir de bons emplois bien rémunérés. »
– L’honorable Patty Hajdu, ministre de l’Emploi, du Développement de la main-d’œuvre et du Travail

« Nous nous réjouissons de la mise en œuvre de ce programme. Il soutiendra la formation des apprentis en milieu syndical au Canada et nous permettra de soutenir le développement d’une main-d’œuvre en construction orientée vers l’avenir, ce qui nous aidera à répondre aux besoins de nos membres. »
Robert Blakely, chef des opérations, Syndicats des métiers de la construction du Canada

Les faits en bref

  • Le Programme pour la formation et l’innovation en milieu syndical, annoncé dans le budget de 2016, sera lancé en 2017-2018. Son financement initial s’élèvera à 10 millions de dollars et 25 millions de dollars lui seront affectés chaque année par la suite.
  • Un appel de propositions pour le Programme commencera le 24 juillet.
  • Il y aura deux volets de financement :
    • Soutien financier aux syndicats pour l’achat d’équipement et de matériel de formation modernes qui aidera les syndicats à suivre l’évolution constante de la technologie et à satisfaire aux normes de l’industrie;
    • Financement de façons novatrices de surmonter les difficultés qui empêchent les femmes et les Autochtones d’entreprendre une carrière dans les métiers spécialisés.

Document d’information

Le Programme pour la formation et l’innovation en milieu syndical, annoncé dans le budget de 2016, sera axé sur les métiers désignés Sceau rouge et créera des partenariats diversifiés avec de nombreux intervenants. Le programme devrait :

  • aider à améliorer la qualité de la formation grâce à des investissements dans l’équipement;
  • intégrer une participation syndicale accrue dans la formation des apprentis;
  • soutenir des approches novatrices et des partenariats avec d’autres intervenants, y compris les employeurs.

Le programme est ouvert à tous les syndicats, y compris à ceux qui n’offrent pas de formation reconnue par les provinces et les territoires comme étant une formation technique d’apprenti en salle de classe et à ceux qui ne gèrent pas d’établissement de formation.

Les métiers spécialisés sont de plus en plus populaires et constituent un élément vital de notre économie. Promouvoir les carrières dans ces domaines est essentiel pour notre avenir. Malgré une augmentation du nombre d’inscriptions dans les programmes d’apprentis, les métiers sont toujours perçus comme étant un second choix après les études universitaires. Selon une enquête menée en 2012, bien que les deux tiers des étudiants de 15 ans croient que les métiers spécialisés sont bien rémunérés, moins de 10 % indiquent qu’ils prévoient assurément faire carrière dans les métiers spécialisés. Ceux qui ont exprimé leur intérêt étaient également plus susceptibles d’avoir de faibles résultats en mathématiques, en lecture et en résolution de problèmes, qui constituent des obstacles à la réussite d’un programme d’apprenti.

Le programme vise à aider les groupes qui font habituellement face à des obstacles relatifs à l’exercice et à la réussite dans les métiers spécialisés, notamment les femmes et les Autochtones. La représentation des femmes dans les métiers non traditionnels désignés Sceau rouge se situait à 4 % en 2014. Parmi les difficultés que doivent surmonter les femmes pour accéder aux métiers figurent les obstacles psychologiques, le manque de mentors, la difficulté à trouver un employeur, la discrimination et les obligations familiales. Les Autochtones font également face à des obstacles semblables, en plus d’autres comme l’insuffisance du soutien financier, les différences culturelles et les stéréotypes négatifs.

 

SOURCE Emploi et Développement social Canada [:]

Construire des connexions